Buttons?

Does my pacemaker have buttons on it? I tend to touch it a lot and I wonder if maybe I should be mindful of buttons or settings that I could be messing with.


3 Comments

No but...

by AgentX86 - 2019-12-25 00:32:00

You shouldn't be playing with it.  The PM can move around and erode the skin covering it.  You do not want that! It could even be life threatening.

All adjustments are made via near field communications.  Many also have Bluetooth communications but they can only be read via this link.  The settings cannot be changed.  There is also a magnetic switch but there are no mechanical buttons.

no buttons

by dwelch - 2019-12-25 06:18:32

No there are no buttons, that is not how it works.  The magnetic switch mentioned above uses a strong magnetic field it is not a switch you can touch.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artificial_cardiac_pacemaker

This day and age with all the lawsuits and fear of lawsuits you might not be able to keep your old pacers.  I was able to keep a few but they no longer allow me to have them.  Like the picture in the link above and wherever you see advertisments or other pictures that is what they look like.  The body is encased in metal, both sides look the same just mirror image.  The "top" has the connectors for however many leads you require, based on your condition number of leads, battery size and perhaps other factors determine which one your doctor orders and installs.

It is a hard metal case and hard plastic on top, there are no mechanical buttons.

You wont hurt the device by fiddling with it or being hit by something, you/your skin/body are the weak point here, if you are touching it gently just because you are getting used to it thats normal.  From your posts you have had it for a while so should be used to it by now.

No buttons

by IPGENG12 - 2019-12-26 18:10:59

Hi,  I definitely agree with the advice not to fiddle with the pacemaker on any regular basis.  Depending on how forceful and regular the external manipulation of the device is, you can induce what's known as "Twiddler's Syndrome" where the movement and rotation of the device with respect to the leads can compromise the leads- a bad situation all around!  It can definitely be life-threatening.  Having said that,  I do occasionally touch the device gently and think- "dang,  this piece of electronics is keeping me alive!".   

Have a great New Year!

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