After the implant comes the water

Hello everyone, 
Well for the second time I admit myself to the hospital for retaining too much water, about a month or so ago I was not able to breath normal, it was a restricted breathing, it turned out that I retained water then. Yesterday I did the same, my belly was bigger than ever and hard, felt like there is a ton of fluids in there, and it was, also my lower abdomen and legs, at the hospital they gave me Lasix 60mg shot to bring the fluids out of me.

Now I'm feeling better after I spent the night emptying my water. I was told that this happened because I have CHF, so now I'm waiting for my doctor to discuss with me the future plans and how we are going to treat this issues.

Anyone had this experienced? What caused it? And if treated, how did you treat it?

P. S. Since the implant on March 15, 2021 I have not slept more than 3 hours stretch at night, it is sleepless nights for me, and my cardiologist says that I am anxious, does that make sense?


4 Comments

CHF

by Julros - 2021-05-12 14:32:47

Congestive heart failure (CHF)  is a rather complex subject with more than one cause. It is often related to a damged heart muscle as a result of an MI, or myocardial infarction. The heart is a pump, and when the pump doesn't squeeze out enough blood with each contraction, it "backs up", or "fails", causing congestion. If the left side fails, then blood/fluid backs up in to the lungs, making breathing labored. If it backs up on the right side, you get edema in your extremities, abdomen, and sometimes full-body. 

Because this is a complex condition, it is treated in multiple steps. Your have recieved lasix which aided your kidneys to release excess fluid. You may be prescribed this on a routine basis, plus potassium which is lost with the fluid. You have a CRT-D, which will assist with more efficient  heart contractions plus zap you if you go into a lethal heart rhythm. There are other medications that are used to relax the heart and blood vessels and counteract some of the systems in your body that can impact heart function. 

As for sleep, you may have fluid in your lungs causing some breathlessness. Do you prop yourself up with pillows, or sleep in a recliner? This helps some people. 

water retention

by new to pace.... - 2021-05-12 19:32:19

You might try eating celery, the fennel bulb and aspargus  which are all natural direutics.  To remove your  water.  Works. 

new to pace

After implant comes the water

by Roger A - 2021-05-12 21:02:28

Jurlos, I purchased one of those triangular pillows and I use one more pillows on top of it. I don't think I have any fluids in my lungs, I did in the past but now my lungs are clear, I fall asleep and then Wake up for bathroom but I can't fall asleep anymore, wide awake for hours. My pacemaker is working just fine but I can't understand why am retaining fluids since the pacemaker is working as it is suppose to. No doctor is answering that for me.

Your pacemaker is not the problem

by asully - 2021-05-13 00:29:36

Needing a pacemaker and having CHF are two different conditions.  Sometimes related, sometimes one leads to the other, sometimes unrelated.  A pacemaker helps your hearts electrical system when it malfunctions.  CHF is congestive heart failure which as others have said can result from a number of conditions and circumstances.  The fluids you talk about are the "congestion" in CHF.  So to break it down simply you have some form of heart failure that is causing you to retain fluids.  Your pacemaker can not treat CHF although you may have a pacemaker as a result of whatever condition has led to your CHF.  Often times episodes of CHF are caused by not taking the medications doctors prescribe such as diuretics (lasix), eating too much salt, or not following a low salt diet.  Other times acute episodes of CHF just happen as the muscle cells of the heart grow weaker.  Your general cardiologist will likely be able to explain to you why you have CHF.

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