Hairdressing

Recent questions from members about haidressing have tended to be about driers etc. My concern is the clippers. I have to keep even fairly weak magnetic fields , e.g. from loudspeakers i mobile 'phones, away (so must always hold my 'phone to my RIGHT ear, and AC fields, e.g. from induction hobs, or welders are also likely to scramble the programming. I know the motors in hair clippers are very small, but is there any possibly that they could be a problem if they come very close to my implant?


6 Comments

Overreacting

by AgentX86 - 2020-01-25 11:07:01

I'm rather conservative about such things (my EP is, so I listen [*]) and even I'm not worried about such little things.  High end headphones (with neodynium magnets) shouldn't be placed directly on the PM but otherwise nothing you list above is a problem.  Some cell phones may have a neodynium magnet in the speaker but, again, don't place it directly on your PM and all will be well.  PMs are sheilded from EM radiation very well so a cell phone on your ear, even on the PM side isn't going to cause any problems.  The big issue is strong AC magnetic fields, like you may find in a power station or perhaps an elevator machine room (particularly welders) can cause problems.  If you're PM dependent stay away from these places.  If you're not dependent, the chances of a serious problem are exceedingly small.

[*] I am PM dependent and my EP has banned me from using a riding lawn mower.  No working on car engines for the same reason (distance to the alternator). Hand yard tools, either electric or gas aren't a problem because they're used at arm's lenght and don't have automotive style ignition systems (alternator/starter + battery). Of course, no AC welding.

Hairdressing

by chemretd - 2020-01-25 12:11:52

Thanks. I'm told hand - held electric drills are OK. I also have a bench drill with about a 1HP motor, but this is mounted ar the back, and I would be 2 - 3 ft. from it. I hear that 2ft from an induction hob is OK and I bet these have a much stronger mag. field.

Wooooo Doogie

by Joe Newbie - 2020-01-25 20:46:24

I am glad I read that about riding lawnmowers. I know car battery chargers are done with, I tossed my cable to a guy after he popped my hood and told him I have a PM he has to hook them up.

What about my cordless tools, I always use my chest to give that extra push/force so it's right next to me.

 

Electromagnetic fields

by Good Dog - 2020-01-25 23:25:26

I am not recommending that anyone do what I have done, but I just want to provide some assurance that our PM's are very well protected from electromagnetic fields. I have had four different  Medtronic dual chamber PM's over 33 years. During that time I had attended training at the Niagara Falls Power Generating Station and stood within a foot of several giant turbine generators. I also worked on and around 11,000 volt 3,000 h.p. synchronus motors and motor control centers. Multiple 440 v 1,000 KW diesel generators, multiple types of high voltage (440 v) variable frequency drive motor controllers and on my free time I have operated my chain saw cutting firewood for a few hours. I always approached those situations very slowly and carefully in an effort to determine if I felt any changes. I am happy to say that I never experienced a problem and nothing unusual ever showed-up on any interrogations.

My point is that with my experience, I would not worry about any beauty shop equipment.

Note: I revised my answer. I had originally written the word "magnetic fields" while I was referencing electromagnetic fields. There is obviously a big difference. Sorry for any confusion!

Magnetic fields

by AgentX86 - 2020-01-26 01:00:12

No PMs are not shielded from magnetic fields.  That's the problem.  They're well sheilded from electric fields and EM fields but the only thing that will shield magnetic fields is massive amounts of ferrous metal and trust me, there is no iron in a pacemaker or its leads.  The problem is that strong AC magnetic fields can induce an AC current in the leads, causing PM oversensing.  It only takes millivolts for the PM to think a normal heartbeat has occured, so it does nothing and watches for the next.  Do nothing for a long time and things can go bad.  If your pacemaker doesn't do much (low pacing percentage), you won't notice this but if you're paced at 100%, you might feel bad so move away from the problem.  If you're dependent, you may not have a chance to get away from the device because they heart won't beat at all.

Car chargers aren't a problem because they're DC.  Electric drills are too small to cause any problem, as is a drill press at that distance.

Magnets - Again!

by donr - 2020-01-28 21:03:03

The whole world is screwed up paranoid about magnets    Last week I was in getting a new CPAP and mask.  The tech in the store offereed me a new mask w/ a foam rubber mask seal and strtaps that had small Neodynium magnets to hold the mask straps on. THEN he realized I had a PM and excreted a brick - "Oh, you can'tu use this harness, it has magnets in it.  They were about the size of pencil erasures.  Big deal.  I told him the world was paranoid and took the magnets and slapped them up against my PM.  He came unglued.  At that point I gave him a quick lectuure on permanent magnets and their keepers.  I have used the mask every night for two weeks and   it works just fine.  Best head harness I've ever had. 

Dohnr

You know you're wired when...

You forecast electrical storms better than the weather network.

Member Quotes

I had a pacemaker when I was 11. I never once thought I wasn't a 'normal kid' nor was I ever treated differently because of it. I could do everything all my friends were doing; I just happened to have a battery attached to my heart to help it work.