Micra pacemaker

Hi all. I'm 76 and I have arithmia and bradicardia - 30-34 permanent pulse. I'm getting Micra next week. I'm so afraid I cannot sleep. I cry a lot because of fear. I know I can do it but I'm so scared.

I have also high blood presure and I'm freaking out.

How was the procedure for you?

How long did you stay in hospital?

Did you do full anastesia or just local?

How did you feel after the procedure?

Can you feel the device inside your heart?

I hope the device can make me feel normal again so I can walk and have normal activities and not feel without energy and weak.

Any input is appreciated.

 


6 Comments

Freaking out

by AgentX86 - 2019-11-29 11:27:43

I don't have a Micra pacemaker but I've had six catheterizations, five on the heart, three of them ablations and one to insert my PM leads (actually two at once - PM implant and AV ablation).  The other two catheterizations were to look at a carotid artery and find the blockage before my CABG surgery.  About half were done with a local and varying amounts of "consious sedation").  The other half, including my PM implant and carotiid angiography (intended to be a stent but no need), were done with just locals.  I was completely lucid and talking with the doctors doing the procedures.  In half of the procedures I went home the same day.  The other half, I stayed overnight.  In all cases we stopped for lunch on the way home and I was back at work the day after I left the hospital.  If everything goes right (over 99% of the time), it's a big nothing.

Of all the procedures, the worst part was laying on my back for several hours in the recovery room (for the catheter insertion wound to fully clot. They pump you full of fluids during the surgery and my bladder got really full in the hours after.  ;-) 

I had to have a TEE for several of the procedures, as well.  That sucked, when I was completely awake but I decided I'd go with it and that made it a lot easier.  Fighting it just makes it that much worse.  I don't know if you'll need that for a Micra insertion.  You might ask. Again, it's uncomfortable but tollerable.

I also have permanent Afib/flutter. A PM doesn't do anything for for it but the AV ablation (with PM) makes it so it no longer controls (ruins) my life.

No, you won't feel it in your heart.  Not one bit. You won't have the recovery pain that those of us with a conventional pacemaker have, either. You may have a little tenderness in your leg for a few days but that's it. 

I'm not sure how a Micra (VVI mode pacemaker) helps for arryhthmias but you haven't stated what sort of arrhythmia. Not sure how it helps bradycardia, either but, again, I don't have the information or the training that your EP has.  He's the one you need to listen to.  We're not doctors but have been through these things (he likely hasn't).

The bottom line is that the worrying can be a lot worse than the procedure.  Overall, about 1/3 of PM recipients feel much better immediately (I was in that group), about 1/3 feel a marked improvement in the month following the procedure, and the remainder don't feel much difference. A lot of the difference in the three groups is why they received the pacemaker. My bet is that you'll be in the first or second group.  A lot will depend on your physical condition now.  If you haven't been exercising because of your heart condition, you may be slower to recover.  I highly recommend cardiac rehab, followed by a membership to a gym (complete with regular use ;-), to get back your strength. If you sit back and feel sorry for yourself, you'll probably fall into the third group.  You don't want to be there.

There is no need to worry yourself sick.  It really isn't as big of a deal as you're making it. You'll be through the procedure before you know it.

 

 

Hi

by Bionic Beat - 2019-11-29 22:18:19

First, stop crying and freaking out.

Its a very simple procedure for which you will likely get 'conscious sedation' where you are in a dreamlike situation; you feel only pressure, no pain yet you can respond to the doctors.

They also freeze up your chest, as does your dentist only moreso.

It will be either go home later that day or the next day.

You might not need pain killers, they will assess you at the hospital.

I've had three pacemakers in just over a decade.  

The first was supposed to last a long time but was recalled, so it had to be switched to a different kind.

The second only took two wires and a year later I needed the third wire, so it had to be removed/exchanged at the same time they inserted the third wire.

You will be able to return to your life in no time at all and will feel much better.

Have a nice cuppa and put on a movie.  Relax, you'll be fine.  ;-)

Hi

by AgentX86 - 2019-11-30 00:06:52

1943 is getting a Micra pacemaker, not a conventional pacemaker.  The micra is inserted right into the ventricle via a catheter in the femoral vein.  There are no wires.

<https://www.medtronic.com/us-en/patients/treatments-therapies/pacemakers/our/micra.html>

Calm yourself!

by Gotrhythm - 2019-11-30 19:36:53

Getting a pacemaker is not the end of life as you know it. Hopefullly, it's the beginning of a new chapter in which you feel better and no longer have to worry about what your heart is doing. Because the pacemaker is there, making sure the beat goes on.

The Micra pacemaker is so small that getting one is not at all the same thing as the more conventional pacemakers like I have. Yours won't even be visible under the skin.

About anesthesia. You will probably be asked what you would prefer and careful attention paid to what will make you most comfortable.

I have no idea if you can feel the Micra working or not. I know I don't feel mine working. It really feels no different from how it has felt all my life.

There is every reason to think the Micra will allow you to live and enjoy your life more than you have in a while--maybe a long time. I couldn't believe how much better I felt immediately.

Still, a pacemaker isn't the same as a young heart. You'll feel better, but there will likely be some period of adjustment. 

Getting used to a pacemaker, adapting to one is as much mental as physical. How well you do will depend a lot on your attitude. Your attitude is up to you.

 

Thank you

by Micra 1943 - 2019-12-02 02:44:08

Thank you for your answers. They have been helpful to think positive.

Tough answers!

by Marmite - 2019-12-05 13:55:22

 Yes pacemakers are helpful devices and yes it helps to have a positive attitude but the thought of cardiac surgery whilst awake is frightening and it might help if you tell your surgeon just how afraid you are, particularly if it's affecting your blood pressure. 

Your device is implanted differently to mine, so I can't answer your other questions, but try to deal with your fear before the operation and ask for some help with it if it's getting out of hand. I'm not the toughest of people either!! Good luck. 

 

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Pacemakers are very reliable devices.