Cardiac MRI Question

Inserted 10/22/19.  When I was in the hospital a Cardiac MRI was ordered.  My Dr used it to look at the electrical function of my heart .

i had a bypass 12 years ago so I asked what did the MRI .which was with contrast , reveal concerning my arteries. 

He said he had no idea as he was only looking at electrical function. 

After I got out I emailed my cardiologist and asked if it could be looked at ...he said no but he could do a PET scan if I wanted. 

Coukd i take this MRI study somewhere else for evaluation ?

i feel like since the data exists why not evaluate and learn as much as possible - so far no one seems to agree with me .

i looked around the internet and found that MRIs are starting to be used as a less invasive means to diagnose arterial schlorosis ....

Thoughts ?


2 Comments

CARDIAC MRI

by Gemita - 2019-11-17 12:55:28

Hello Pacer2019

Although MRI would be my preferred option because it is less invasive and there is no radiation exposure, if heart disease is seen by the cardiologist during an MRI, what could he do about it ?  He would not be able to, for instance, insert a stent or widen a narrowed artery.  The gold standard when heart disease is likely is the Angiogram.  Some hospitals, especially in the UK would not offer both tests because of the cost unfortunately, but I dont know where you are, so ask by all means.

The MRI that exists has not specifically focussed on your arteries and maybe that is why a PET scan was offered instead.  I know it is incredible, but the referring doctor usually tells the radiologists what to look for and this will be what the test will focus on.  I have often asked my doctors whether they saw any evidence of something, but they simply reply "we werent looking for that !!"

I also recall when my hubby was in hospital for heart disease, his doctors mentioned that although MRI was able to produce detailed pictures, putting a catheter in and "directly" visualising an artery during an angiogram was far superior.  Hope that has answered your question

Thanks

by Pacer2019 - 2019-11-17 13:34:14

that’s good feedback. I just figured since they did it and Im sure it cost an absolute fortune why not gleen has much data as possible .

I did once ask a doctor why not just do a full body MRI on people ..he said because we are afraid we might find something to treat that doesn’t really need treated 😬.

like my neurologist also said they had studied thousands of MRIs of peoples spines and in a very high % of cases they indicated surgery seemed necessary - in reality a small number has any symptoms or problems . 

I see online for a fee I can get my MRI read by a third party ....maybe that’s something I will investigate 

thanks again 

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