First time to get "shock"

Hi, yesterday is the first time for me to get "shock" from my ICD after implanted in Feb 2019. 5 times in a row..

Before i get shock, im was city cycling about 15-20 km using brompton (16 inch wheel). 

Does anyone have same experience with me?


4 Comments

Say what?

by The_beat_goes_on - 2019-10-20 22:26:25

Uhhhh what do you mean shocked? You can feel when it zaps you into "normal rhythm?

I only feel a slight thump-like a skipped heartbeat

by DriverMama - 2019-10-21 08:54:02

Pacemaker implanted 1/29/19 & loop recorder removed

I’m only aware of the pacemaker activating by a slight thump in my chest and checking my Fitbit for a change in my heart rate.

But that thump is the same feeling I previously felt when my heart skipped a beat.

So I wonder if it’s the slow heartbeat & not the pacemaker activating.

I only feel a slight thump-like a skipped heartbeat

by DriverMama - 2019-10-21 08:54:03

Pacemaker implanted 1/29/19 & loop recorder removed

I’m only aware of the pacemaker activating by a slight thump in my chest and checking my Fitbit for a change in my heart rate.

But that thump is the same feeling I previously felt when my heart skipped a beat.

So I wonder if it’s the slow heartbeat & not the pacemaker activating.

ICD or Pacemaker? Not exactly the same things

by Gotrhythm - 2019-10-21 15:35:11

I'm afraid some of the above comments are from people who don't exactly what an ICD is or what it does.

An ICD and a pacemaker are not the same, although sometimes people have an ICD and pacemaker all in one, in which case they have an ICD-P.

Most people don't feel their pacemaker "working" at all. They notice no difference between a pacemaker activated beat and one the heart produces on its own. DriverMama, it's posssible that it feels the same as a "skipped beat" because it is a "skipped beat." Pacemakers don't make "skipped beats" go away.

ICD stands for Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator. It's doing the same thing as the paddles they use in ERs but you are wearing it in your body. It delivers a jolt of electricity that stops the heart. When the heart restarts, hopefully, it is back in normal rhythm. If it isn't then the ICD will deliver another shock.

And yes, the person feels it. Big time. One of our members refers to the feeling as a "Jesus jolt."

Novolubis, I understand that you got a shock 5 times while cycling. I don't understand what the size of the wheel has to do with getting a shock. And I'm not sure what your question is.

Please post again, asking what you really want to know. Lot of our members have ICDs and will be happy to help you.

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